Why Wash Your Car Regular?

Protect the Paint Job with a Car Wash.

Your car comes into contact with a lot of debris: dirt, bugs, bird droppings, salt and grime. If left untreated, these deposits could eventually eat away at the finish and paint, damaging the metal beneath. A run through the car wash will eliminate these deposits. The simple rule of thumb is, when you can see the dirt on your car, it’s time for a wash.

Car Washes Improve Fuel Efficiency.

As absurd as it sounds, regular car washes will help to improve your car’s overall fuel economy. A layer of dirt on your car increases drag, causing it to use more fuel. A washed and clean car allows for air to move more easily across its surface.

Personal Pride and Well-Being.

Much like your home, you feel better when your car is clean and spotless, rather than coated in a layer of dirt with a helpful “wash me” hand drawn on the rear windshield. While your home occasionally becomes a bit messy, you still regularly clean the bathrooms and wipe down kitchen counters, right? It’s the same idea with your car. It’s your largest accessory, and a regular car wash will keep it looking its best.404

Maintain the Resale Value.

Besides making you feel good, regular car washes will help maintain appearance and overall resale value. Sure, you love your car, but a day will come when you’re in the market for a new and improved one. A regular car wash is an inexpensive way to keep your car looking great—increasing its resale value.

Quick and Easy.

There’s no denying that a quick run through the car wash is extremely convenient. For the price of ten to fifteen dollars and around ten minutes of your time, you can fit a car wash into even the busiest of schedules. It’s a simple form of preventative maintenance that’ll keep your car protected and in good physical condition.

If you live in Sevier County Tn , Please call me at 865-361-3137 for Specials on Auto Detailing or Web Site : https://stats-auto-spa.com/

How to Decontaminate Your Paint

here are many out there who have seen that their car’s paint looks dulled or faded and decided to give it a nice wash and layer of wax. However, their paint still doesn’t have that “show-car shine” that they always see on other people’s cars. If you find yourself in a similar situation, the problem may not be with your washing or waxing technique. The issue is most likely that your paint is ridden with millions of microscopic contaminates caused by a plethora of environmental and artificial sources. It is difficult to see these contaminants as they are not nearly as apparent as dirt or dust is, but they can certainly be felt. If you ever run your hand across your car’s paint and it feels almost like sandpaper, that is the result of contaminants.

The causes of these contaminants are plenty, so trying to simply remove the causes from the equation is a fruitless effort toward an impossible goal. The only way to ensure that these luster-stealing contaminants do not rob you of the opportunity to achieve that “show-car shine” is to routinely remove them from your paint’s surface. However, these contaminants are not as easily defeated as the dirt or dust that collects itself on your car’s surfaces. These contaminants are much more resilient that require a much more aggressive approach to remove. So, how do you rid your paint of these pesky shine thieves? We have put together this perfect, all-inclusive guide to help you do just that!
Chemical Decontamination:

Due to the microscopic nature of these contaminants, you are not always able to eliminate them entirely using strictly mechanical means. Often times, it will require a two-step process to be able to adequately remove them from your paint. The first step, chemical decontamination, will use a product that contains special chemicals that react with these contaminants to break them down and make them easy to wash off your paint. This step will be able to remove the smaller piece of contamination the mechanical process can’t quite reach. Because chemical decontamination is much safer on your car’s paint, you want to remove the majority of the contamination chemically first.
Pre-chemical decontamination considerations:

1. As with any other process that involves using products on your paint, you want to make sure that your paint is not too hot. If your paint is too hot, it will cause the product to dry onto the paint much more quickly, which can lead to unsightly residue. Always make sure that your paint is cool to the touch and in a shaded area before chemically decontaminating your car.

2. If your car is in particularly bad shape, you may need to wash the larger, looser contaminants, dirt, and dust off the surface before decontaminating it.

Wax & Polishing Your Car

Benefits of Waxing Your Car:

  • Ease of application – Car waxes are one of the easiest forms of protection to apply. It’s a simple spread on and wipe off product!
  • Versatility – They can also be applied to wide variety of vehicles and finishes including car, truck, boat, bike, RV, aircraft, personal watercraft, snowmobile, ATV, tractor/farm equipment, golf cart, snowplow, exterior gel coat, fiberglass, clear coat, single stage, lacquer paints and highly finished wood. You will find your self using the same wax for many different things!
  • Cost effectiveness – Some of the best waxes on the market that we offer are extremely low cost. Not only that, but they go an extremely long way with each application using minimal product.
  • Tried and true – Car wax is one of the oldest most tried and true forms of protecting a vehicles paint! Again it may not be the longest lasting or best protectant but it absolutely has a time and place in every detailers arsenal. Some waxes provide almost a year of protection with very little work involved.
  • Damage reduction – Car wax will help minimize the damage caused by scratches, wash marring, bird droppings, bugs, and UV rays!

Tips for How To Get Your Car To Shine:


  • The first step to getting the best shine on your car is to properly clean and wash your ride. Removing all dirt from your vehicle protects it from scratches that may occur during the waxing and polishing process. In addition, you should use the right car wash mitts for the job.
  • After removing contaminants from your car, Use an IRON REMOVER then the next step is to remove any blemishes and paint marks using high-quality polishing products. Car polishing compounds will restore your vehicle’s paint, providing a lasting, smooth finish.
  • No job is complete without the right tools, and polishing pads are essential for the compound’s proper application. Buffing pads ensure a smooth finish and restore your paint to perfect condition.
  • After polishing, you must seal and protect the beautiful finishes. Coatings and spray waxes will seal your car’s paint, ensuring long-lasting results. Use a microfiber applicator for a flawless outcome.

Check Out Stats Auto Spa Web Site

What is SiO2?

A lot of products claim to have SiO2 technology, but what exactly is SiO2? Scientifically speaking, SiO2, also called silica dioxide, is found in nature as quartz. It is meant to provide a rock-hard layer of protection to your surfaces. It has the characteristics of being water repellent, hard and self-healing. SiO2 bonds with itself intensely, creating a large amount of surface tension. This surface tension prevents water from bonding to the surface at all. Instead, the water will bond with itself, creating water beads.

Water beading is helpful because it allows the water to be easily removed from the surface, either because it rolls off due to wind, because it is on an angled panel, or thanks to a dryer or drying towel. Because the water does not remain on the surface, it will not evaporate on the surface. You don’t want the water evaporating on the surface, because the minerals inside the water will still remain on the surface, causing a water spot.Water spots can easily ruin how even the most cared for car looks!
And no one likes water spots on their paint, windows or even wheels. Luckily, SiO2 prevents these water spots!

If you want a quote on full detail with SiO2 products call please visit statsauto.com

Automobile Carpet Cleaning & Odor Removal

The natural way of odor removal

If your car has quite the stink, maybe it’s coming from the carpet. And if it’s coming from the carpet, we can help. Vinegar is our solution of choice.

Find two bowls and fill them with vinegar. Place these bowls in the car- one near the front of the car, the other near the back.

Close all the doors and windows, allowing the vinegar to sit overnight. The idea is that the bowls of vinegar will absorb the offending odors.

Additionally, think about sprinkling baking soda on your car’s carpet, chairs, and all the upholstery in your car.

In the morning, you can vacuum up the baking powder.

Homemade Carpet Cleaners

Baking Soda + Vinegar + Water

The classic baking soda and vinegar combo is good for so much beyond science fair volcanoes. First, sprinkle just baking soda over the stained area. You can also mix in a few drops of a colorless essential oil if you’d like some extra deodorizing power. Allow the baking soda to sit atop the stain for at least an hour and ideally overnight.

Mix vinegar and water in equal parts in a spray bottle, then spray the mixture on top of the baking soda. You should get a satisfying fizzing reaction. After the fizzing has taken place, pat the area with a cleaning rag to blot up the mixture. You may need to repeat the process for particularly stubborn spots. Also for strongers stains try adding one drop of Dr. Bronner’s Sal Suds cleaner per 2 quarts of warm water.

I also like this nice product Vapamore MR-75 Amico Hand Held Steam Cleaner, check it out here https://amzn.to/3cCiFPz

How You Can Kill “RONA” in Your Car Without Damaging Interior Surfaces

As COVID-19 spreads, you’ve probably already learned how to wash them hands and keeping your couch soaked with Lysol.


But what about the inside of your car?

If you or someone else who has been in your car shows symptoms of the illness, you should clean frequently touched surfaces, including the steering wheel, door handles, shift lever, any buttons or touch screens, wiper and turn signal stalks, passenger and driver door armrests, grab handles, and seat adjusters.

If you’re a taxi or ride-hailing driver who carries lots of passengers, driving a rented or shared car, or if you live somewhere with many cases of COVID-19, regularly cleaning these surfaces is a must.

Vigorous washing with soap and water can also destroy a coronavirus “RONA”. “RONA” are surrounded by a protective envelope that helps them to infect other cells, and destroying that envelope can effectively disarm them.

Think of this as a spring cleaning, one that will need to be done routinely now to keep abreast of spreading the risk of contamination. You can take all of this a step further if you happen to be equipped with a steam cleaner and a UV light to reveal areas you missed. But the basic element of combating a virus is simple: adequate use of soap and water. While an interior cleaning has always been good car-care practice, it is imperative now more than ever to keep yourself healthy and free from any viruses that are making their rounds through the world.

For leather steering wheels, seating, and trim, a combination of soap and water is a safe and sufficient way to clean them. Do not scrub hard when cleaning your leather interior, and avoid excess suds and water. Hand washing has been recommended as a primary way to protect oneself against infection by “RONA”. This is not only because soap can kill the virus, but also because the friction of washing contributes. This holds true for washing your leather interior as well.

It is important to prioritize these “high touch” areas of your car when disinfecting. Things like the ventilation grilles and knobs, as well as the rear view mirror are all common touch points in a vehicle. All wiping and cleaning should be done with a microfiber cloth if you have one available. Not only do they do a great job of trapping dirt, but they also prevent scratches.

GO BACK TO HELL “RONA” 🙂


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How to Mix IPA (Isopropyl Alcohol) Spray

IPA stands for Isopropyl Alcohol or what is commonly known as rubbing alcohol that you’ll find at your corner grocery store. It is sold to consumers in different concentration percentages; including 91%, 70%, and 50%.

Basically, consider these percentages like alcohol “proof” or strength. And NO, you don’t drink this alcohol – that would be very bad.

Now, here is where the confusion comes. It’s assumed by many people that IPA and IPA spray for prep work or removing wax or oils are the same thing. That’s just not accurate. IPA Spray is diluted IPA to eventually become a 10 to 25 percent IPA solution. It’s best to mix your isopropyl alcohol with distilled water and mixed into a BPA-free plastic spray bottle.

There are different schools of thought when it comes to formulating the best IPA Spray concentration. And, quite frankly, there is some science that goes into perfecting the right formula. Now, let’s get something very clear – I’m not going to disclose anyone’s factory secret formulation here.

But this introduces a problem that most automotive blogs – even the expert detailers that use it simply don’t consider. Not all store-bought isopropyl alcohol is the same percentage. As we indicated above, there are generally three grades or percentages of isopropyl alcohol – 91 percent, 70 percent, and 50 percent.

If you read several automotive blogs, they’ll swear that it doesn’t matter which one you use, just mix it at a 50/50 ratio with tap water. As Luke Skywalker said in The Last Jedi, “Everything you said in that sentence is wrong.”

First off, if you mix a 91% IPA with distilled water at a ratio of 50% IPA and 50% water, you’ll get a final IPA dilution of roughly 45 percent. That’s too high – and will cause streaking and might even lead to damage of clear coats or unprotected surfaces like headlight covers.

Now, let’s dive down to the 70% IPA. Same 50/50 blend and you’ll get about 35 percent isopropyl alcohol. Again – too strong.

Finally, when you do the half-and-half blend with the 50% store-purchased IPA bottle, you achieve a total blend of 25%. That’s on the top of our range, but still a bit too high for my taste. Especially if you did not use cutting compound or complete paint correction. I’ll explain below in detail.

The magic number we’re looking for is between 10 and 25. So, here is how you accomplish this optimal percentage.

What is IPA Spray?

Is Isopropyl alcohol safe?

IPA stands for Isopropyl Alcohol or what is commonly known as rubbing alcohol that you’ll find at your corner grocery store. It is sold to consumers in different concentration percentages; including 91%, 70%, and 50%.

Basically, consider these percentages like alcohol “proof” or strength. And NO, you don’t drink this alcohol – that would be very bad.

Now, here is where the confusion comes. It’s assumed by many people that IPA and IPA spray for prep work or removing wax or oils are the same thing. That’s just not accurate. IPA Spray is diluted IPA to eventually become a 10 to 25 percent IPA solution. It’s best to mix your isopropyl alcohol with distilled water and mixed into a BPA-free plastic spray bottle.

Why is IPA Spray Used as a Prep for DIY Nano Ceramic Coating?

How to Make an IPA Panel Wipe for Detailing

The prep process for applying a ceramic coating is not that complex. Once you complete paint correction, and debris the surface of contaminants and waxes, there will be residual oils and other materials on the surface.

Since the intent of a nano-ceramic coating is to penetrate deep into the surface, you want to have a completely clean canvass to work with for optimal results. To accomplish this, you need to use a product that is good at removing oils and residue but won’t damage the clear coat or raw surface. A diluted isopropyl alcohol solution has been shown to be the best option in this case.

Polishes and cutting compounds contain carrier oils that allow the material to grasp onto the surface. Isopropyl Alcohol works to break down these oils and other surface contaminants and leaves a completely clean area to apply the ceramic coating.

Factoring the Correct IPA Ratio

There are different schools of thought when it comes to formulating the best IPA Spray concentration. And, quite frankly, there is some science that goes into perfecting the right formula.

That magic number range we’re shooting for is 10 to 25 percent Isopropyl Alcohol.5 AMAZING HACKS Using Only Rubbing Alcohol!So – you’ll buy a big bottle of IPA or rubbing alcohol at the store. What do you do with the rest of it after mixing for your prep work? Well, here is a hottie introducing some hacks.

But this introduces a problem that most automotive blogs – even the expert detailers that use it simply don’t consider. Not all store-bought isopropyl alcohol is the same percentage. As we indicated above, there are generally three grades or percentages of isopropyl alcohol – 91 percent, 70 percent, and 50 percent.

If you read several automotive blogs, they’ll swear that it doesn’t matter which one you use, just mix it at a 50/50 ratio with tap water.

First off, if you mix a 91% IPA with distilled water at a ratio of 50% IPA and 50% water, you’ll get a final IPA dilution of roughly 45 percent. That’s too high – and will cause streaking and might even lead to damage of clear coats or unprotected surfaces like headlight covers.

Now, let’s dive down to the 70% IPA. Same 50/50 blend and you’ll get about 35 percent isopropyl alcohol. Again – too strong.

Finally, when you do the half-and-half blend with the 50% store-purchased IPA bottle, you achieve a total blend of 25%. That’s on the top of our range, but still a bit too high for my taste. Especially if you did not use cutting compound or complete paint correction. I’ll explain below in detail.

The magic number we’re looking for is between 10 and 25. So, here is how you accomplish this optimal percentage.

Step One – Purchase the Right Supplies

If you want to achieve the best results with your IPA spray for prepping prior to ceramic coating application, you want to start with the best supplies. Here is what you should purchase at the local grocery store:

  • (1) 32-ounce BPA-Free Plastic Spray bottle. BPA-Free is best to reduce the spread of bacteria and is eco-friendly. It also resists corrosion of the rubbing alcohol.
  • Purchase the right Isopropyl Alcohol. With regards to brands, it really doesn’t matter. The key is to purchase one that is the best formulation. Since you’re looking for an effective solution for prepping the vehicle, I’d recommend purchasing a 91% IPA bottle. However, if you can only find 70 or 50% bottles, I’ll include the dilution steps below.
  • Purchase distilled water. Why distilled water? Well, water that has been distilled is pure, clean and free of minerals or contaminants. If water is not distilled, it contains calcium, sodium, and other impurities that can leave water spots, and other debris. That kind of defeats the purpose of prepping to result in a perfectly clean surface – huh? So, use distilled water. Plus, it will ‘keep’ longer in the bottle.

Black Friday has come and gone – and boy howdy were we busy! Our big sale on DIY Ceramic Coating Kits was a huge success – and we thank everyone for taking advantage of this deal. During the day, I hopped on with Dale and Eric to answer some questions many of you submitted through our online chat and support portal.

And without question, one of the most popular inquiries was about using IPA spray as a prep for our ceramic coating. What amazed me was how many of our potential customers had been told that applying Isopropyl Alcohol or IPA to their clear coats was a bad idea.

Step Two – Mix it Correctly Based on the IPA Bottle Percentage 

Just so we’re clear, there are three options of IPA bought at the store – 91, 70, and 50 percent. Our goal is to achieve a percentage of 10 to 25 percent. Here is how you accomplish this goal.

The 91 Percent IPA

You’ll be mixing 32 ounces of IPA Spray. Start by pouring four ounces of 91 percent IPA into that 32-ounce spray bottle. Fill the rest of the bottle with distilled water. At this point, you’ll achieve a total IPA percentage of around 11%. That’s good enough to prep for our DIY Nano Coating – especially if you skipped the paint correction step.  

If you want a slightly higher percentage (like if you use a lot of polishing compound for paint correction), then up the IPA percentage to 6 ounces. This will get you to about 17%. If you want to up it to 7 or 8 ounces, that should be done – only if you used some heavy cutting compound for your paint correction.

The 70 Percent IPA

*Editors Note – Save the Wintergreen for your favorite DIP. Go Unflavored for your IPA Spray.

Obviously, if you’re using a more-diluted IPA – you need to revise the blend to achieve that 10 to 20 percent level. In this case, we’ll start with 8-ounces of 70% IPA in that 32-ounce spray bottle. Fill the rest with distilled water. This will give you a percentage of 17.5% total IPA spray solution. That’s a good happy medium as they say. Tipping the can to 9-ounces (bonus points for those old-school nitro fans who got that reference) would put you below that 25 percent threshold.

If you did not complete paint correction, you might want to reduce that initial blend to 6-ounces – which will put you around 13 percent IPA Spray.

The 50 Percent IPA

The final option is blending 50 percent IPA with distilled water. To achieve that happy balance, you’ll mix 8 ounces of 50% IPA in that 32-ounce bottle. Fill the rest with distilled water, and you’ll achieve a 12.5 percentage IPA Spray.

Again, this is a good percentage if you did not use cutting compounds or polishes. If you did, up that IPA to 10 ounces, and you’ll get to 15.5 percent IPA Spray. Turn it up to 11 for a bit higher, but don’t exceed 14-ounces of the 50% stuff.  

Black Friday has come and gone – and boy howdy were we busy! Our big sale on DIY Ceramic Coating Kits was a huge success – and we thank everyone for taking advantage of this deal. During the day, I hopped on with Dale and Eric to answer some questions many of you submitted through our online chat and support portal.

And without question, one of the most popular inquiries was about using IPA spray as a prep for our ceramic coating. What amazed me was how many of our potential customers had been told that applying Isopropyl Alcohol or IPA to their clear coats was a bad idea.

How to Apply IPA Spray

IPA Wipedown… Not The Best Way, But Definitely A WaySo – when he says the 50/50 solution – keep in mind – he’s a detailer looking to STRIP WAX. That’s not what you are doing with PREP work. Good info regardless. Oh – when he says the percent doesn’t matter – well, just read above – I think I PROVED him wrong with our application.

The key to using IPA Spray as a prep for your ceramic coating is to spray and wipe. You don’t want to leave the spray on the surface for extended periods. The best way to use the IPA spray is to spray the solution on the surface. Set the spray bottle to the highest “misting” setting prior to use.

When you spray the IPA solution, focus on one panel at a time. Wipe clean with a dry microfiber towel. When the towel gets moist, use a clean and dry towel. One thing you want to avoid is any streaks. Using multiple microfiber towels during this final prep process is a good way to accomplish this goal.

Wrapping it Up

The thing to remember when using an IPA spray as the final step before applying a DIY ceramic coating is that this is your final opportunity to remove debris and leave a clean surface. However, more is not necessarily better in this case.

Mix the solution between 10 to 25 percent – with higher percentages up to 20 percent if you use the polishing compound in the prep work. Spray and remove quickly and use multiple clean and dry microfiber towels to leave the car as clean as possible. Buy good spray bottles check on the photo below for to buy your bottles on Amazon.

How often should you wax your car?

Waxing. There’s so much gratification witnessing your car transform from a plain clean look to a sparkling diamond. That is what waxing does.

Reason: Beyond the advantage of giving your ride that car show glow, waxing creates a layer of protection that shields your finish from the destructive effects of pollution and the elements. It is a necessary step in preserving your four-wheeled investment.

Depending on the quality of wax you use, protection from a single application can last anywhere from several weeks to several months. Usually, the best waxes come in paste form. Frequency of use can be every one and a half to two months during the dry season, and monthly during the rainy season. This is provided you can properly execute a waxing session. Some waxes come with instructions on how often it is recommended to be applied. You can either follow that or go the extra mile by adding extra layers from the usual applications.

Tip: If you have extra funds, try and stock on a quality carnauba wax and synthetic wax with nano technology. You can perform a double waxing method wherein you start with the synthetic wax, buff away, then finish off with a coat of the carnauba wax for added shine and extra protection. This would be great in preparation for the onslaught of summer’s blistering heat or the attack of monsoon rains. It also increases the interval between applications. Synthetic waxes provide powerful protection from pollution and UV damage while naturally-derived waxes provide unsurpassed shine with a commendable degree of protection as well.

In summary, create your car care habit with these three approaches using good judgment and time interval management. You will reap the fruits of long-term ownership satisfaction and possibly save you money from a repaint in the future.

HOW OFTEN TO WAX A CAR

Even though most people have their own ideas on the frequency and scheduling of cleaning and waxing a vehicle, there are no firm promises made by manufacturers. As such, it can often be a good idea to stick to the general rule of thumb of waxing once per three month period.

Check this TOP BRAND OUT ON AMAZON! One of my favorite waxes

Paint Correction Explained:

Polish, Compound, Wax, Buff,… These terms get thrown around a lot during discussions about car detailing. Often, they are used interchangeably without regard to their real meaning. However, they all have very distinct meanings and knowing how they differ can make a world of difference. Whether you have a show car or just want to have your daily car looking it’s best, learning about the detailing process will insure that you are getting the most out of your time and money.

Before we look at the difference between these terms it is best to get an understanding of what paint correction is.

Paint Correction

Picture the painted surface of your car as a smooth, mirror like plane. Over time, dust, dirt, and other contaminants build up on that smooth surface. Unfortunately, the process of washing this dirt and dust away causes the fine particles to act like sandpaper, scratching and digging grooves into the once smooth clearcoat surface. As these fine scratches build up, the surface becomes dull and hazed. Paint correction is the use of specialized machines and polishing agents to slowly remove microscopic layers of clearcoat to once again make the surface smooth and mirror like.

A buffing or polishing machine (here the words are safely used interchangeably), is a handheld machine with a motorized spinning head. Foam or fiber pads are placed on the head and used to spread wax or polishing agents onto the painted surface.

Think of wax as makeup for your car. Though it is often applied with a buffing or polishing machine, it is simply a coating which fills in the scratches – making them harder to see. Over time the wax is worn and washed away, once again, revealing the underlying scratches. In terms of paint correction, wax is purely cosmetic. It will make your car look good for a short time, but does nothing to remove the underlying scratches.

Removing the scratches requires the slow removal of microscopic layers of clear coat to, once again, level out the surface. Compounding agents or leveling agents are specifically formulated liquids that, when added to the rotating pad of a buffing or polishing machine, act as extremely fine grit sandpaper to slowly shave down the clear coat surface.

Once the compounding agents have done the heavy lifting, a polish is then used to remove any final haze and add to the depth and clarity of the finished surface. Think of polish as an even finer grit sandpaper that is used to fine tune the newly leveled surface, revealing a beautiful, highly polished surface.

Paint correction is the mechanical leveling of clear coat or paint (clear coat is unpigmented paint, clear) to a point where all the paint is free of swirl marks and light scratches.  Swirl marks are essentially a “V” cut/slice in the paint where light bounces around in the valley of the scratch and exits.  This is how you see the swirl marks. If the paint was flat, with no valley, you wouldn’t have anywhere for the light to bounce around…that is where paint correction shines the best.  

As the polishing steps are carried out, there are various degrees of aggressiveness which are used for different levels of desired end results.  For example, not everyone needs or should have “perfect paint,” some are simply ok with much better, not perfect.  Not everyone looks at their paint with a flashlight.  This can be a straightforward and simple process, or a very labor intensive process where experience and knowledge are of the utmost importance depending on the car owner’s expectations.  We take the time to figure out the proper steps and use the correct products to achieve the desired results in a timely fashion.  We don’t cut corners by “filling” in defects by using oils and glazes to make it “look” like things were done, only to find out after two washes all the oils are removed and your paint looks the same as before.

 Our gloss enhancement is designed for those looking for more gloss with a bit of swirl mark removal.  The clarity package is designed for those looking for a good amount of correction (removal of swirls and light scratches) and a lot more gloss. This is our most popular package.  Then there comes the reset package.  This includes a heavy compound step, a medium polish step, and fine final polish step.  The reset is for those looking to really turn their car’s paint around and get back to square one with about 90% to 95% correction.

Paint Protection

Once the painted surface is perfected, it is now ready for a protective layer. Protection comes in the form of waxes and paint sealants. Waxes and sealants are applied in the same way, but offer differing types of protection. Both will protect the painted surface from acid rain, fallout, bird droppings and tree sap. A paint sealant is a synthetic polymer that will provide a high gloss finish yet will last much longer than a wax – up to a year in some cases. It was once the case that though waxes wouldn’t last as long, they would provide a higher gloss and deeper shine. However, paint sealants have come a long way in the last few years – almost making waxes obsolete. Today’s paint sealants have a higher melting point than wax, allowing them to last longer in extreme elements while still providing the depth and shine provided by a wax. Waxes can also be applied over a paint sealant – further protecting the hard work that went into your car.

Taking the sealant process one step further, we enter into the world of polymer coatings. Polymer coatings chemically bond to factory clear coat to provide a permanent protective layer.

We can now see that the act of buffing is not synonymous with polishing, compounding, or waxing. Buffing is a generalized term for making a surface smooth and shiny. Compounding and Polishing are similar in that they fall under the paint correction umbrella, yet vary in the amount of surface that they remove. Waxing, sealing, and coating are similar in that they all offer protection for the recently corrected surface.

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The Effects of Road Salt on Cars &; How to Protect Your Vehicle from Salt Damage

 Many parts of the country winter is going strong, pounding down on the roadways that drivers travel daily. Thankfully your local Department of Transportation (D.O.T.) is out in full swing plowing, sanding, and salting the roads to make it as safe a journey as possible. It’s common knowledge that snow and icy road conditions can cause car accidents. That is also why salt is used on the roads, since it helps to melt snow and ice on the roads, but it also provides some extra traction when combined with sand.

Washing your car in the midst of winter is important, and not just so it can look clean, but also to remove the salt that accumulates. Removing road salt used is the best practice to help prevent rust damage. Brake lines are typically another of the areas affected, so having them checked frequently is important.

Not all car manufacturers sell cars that are better equipped to handle road salt accumulation.

Why does a car rust from road salt?

Metal parts of a car come in contact with precipitation water containing carbon dioxide and oxygen. Road salt contains free-radical ions and they come into contact with the precipitation water. After extended exposure to oxygen, iron oxide forms, which speeds up the rusting process.

Snow Covered Rust

How does road salt work?

Road salt was first introduced in the 1930s as a combatant to make roadways safer for driving. It does this by a chemical reaction lowering water’s freezing point, melting ice so tires can make contact and get traction with the pavement.

It helps prevent the vehicle from sliding when ice is present on the road. The down side to this very important part of road safety, is it’s highly corrosive to vehicles and over time causing rust. The damage can be extensive, but being that it is an abundant, cost effective and easy to work with source, it is arguably the best choice.

Rust is one of the biggest threats road salt residue can cause for vehicles, with repeated exposure, due diligence by the owner is needed. Road salt affects the car’s paint causing corrosion, rust begins forming underneath bubbling up and the metal becomes brittle and flakey. Eventually the damaged area breaks free and if left untreated a hole can occur.

Since road salt promotes rust and can affect its mechanics, the undercarriage of a car or truck has multiple areas road salt can damage if left unmaintained. Locating affected areas can be difficult and having the car looked over by a professional is a good idea. From the frame to the hydraulic brake system, rust can do serious damage making the car unsafe to drive.

For example, the hydraulic brake system carries brake fluid to the brakes for them to expand. If salt causes damage to the line resulting in a leak(s), the brakes don’t work properly, or in some cases not at all.

The Fight Against Road Salt Car Damage – What can you do?

  • Wash your car as soon as possible after each snow or ice storm. At maximum every 10 days.
  • Wash your car when temperatures reach 40 degrees Fahrenheit or higher.
  • Washing your car in daylight hours gives it a better chance of completely drying before temperatures drop at night time.
  • Open and close all the doors, hatch and trunk after washing your car, and lock and unlock doors multiple times. This should be done as soon as possible to prevent freezing shut.
  • Avoid driving in deep snow; it packs against the bottom of the car. This can contribute to rusting and cause driving hazards.

The Finish on a Car – How can you protect it?

Tip: Rain and snow collect the pollutants in air (acid rain) covering your car. This can damage a car’s protective clear-coat finish.

  • Wash your car as soon as possible after each rain shower or snow storm.
  • Using a car wash that does not use recycled water, wash the undercarriage frequently.
  • Road salt collects in pools of water. Avoid driving in puddles.
  • If a paint chip is larger than the tip of a pen, repair it as soon as possible to avoid rust corrosion.
  • To protect your car, apply wax or Ceramic coating to your car at least every 6-months.